Willing to be Illuminated and Pierced

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Jumping high on Gulugod Baboy was Lans (far left), Brian (left), the author (right) and Mommy Gemma, Brian’s mom (far right)

The smell of the sea filled the morning air as the jeepney skidded across the almost lonely road winding along the mountainside. Our eyes were fixed at the resorts that went side-by-side with their assorted names and offers. But we would not be setting our foot on either one of them for this trip. We were about to trek Gulugod Baboy which lies near the diving paradise of Mabini, Batangas.

Gulugod Baboy is one of Batangas’ “chill climbing” destinations. It is called so because it was shaped like a pig’s spine, from which its name has been derived from. Because we have heard of its scenic views, we were willing to pay for that long trip from Mandaluyong City to Batangas that costs about 157 pesos ($3.30). As it was a holiday, we were expecting less traffic. Still, it seemed that traffic has always been a part of our everyday living, even those living southbound. It took us about two hours to reach the Batangas Grand Terminal.

Since we were just groping about with the help of other itineraries found in the internet, we looked for jeepneys that lead to the city of Mabini. But it seems that everything was ready for us. The driver offered everybody going to Gulugod Baboy that he could take us straight to the jump-off point of the mountain, provided that each will pay 100 pesos ($2.10) for the trip. Originally, hikers drop by the Mabini market and take tricycle rides going to the mountain. But I find travelling by jeepney a better alternative as the trip to the jump-off site is also a lengthy one.

The jeepney took us straight to the registration site. Registration is only 35 pesos ($0.74). The tour guide fee, which was at 500 pesos ($10.50) can be divided depending of the number of people in the group. But our group of five decided not to share the tour with another group because we’d like to have a good chit-chat with Jericho, the young tour guide. Besides, we’d like to enjoy the tour ourselves and we’d surely be left out by the large group of young strangers.

The first leg of the trail was covered by a cemented road. With the trail going too steep for IMG_20160225_101558motorbikes and other two-wheeled vehicles, I wonder if this was a wise idea. It can get too slippery when the rain pours. Good thing that the drizzle that welcomed us at our arrival did not last too long. We were hoping for a good clearing ahead…and a good, rough road that will keep my shoes on the ground.

There were a few motorbikes passing through the steep trail and ending up in some far end of the road. From the main road, there’s another road branching out from it. Our guide said it leads to another town. Now, I know where these motorbikes would be going. Not unless they would be going to the nearest store just near us.

Nah, maybe it was meant to be at the next store. Or to the other one…just over there! I find this a commercialized hiking destination as there were stores lined up in nearly every meter of the trek. They offer buko juice, sodas, and even halo-halo (which was only 30 pesos or $0.63) to every weary traveller that passes by. But not now. We’ll reward IMG_20160225_102601ourselves later.

Though having a cemented road for a mountain trail looks sumptuous for the tired tourist, I’d prefer the old, dirt road where I can have a good footing. Just as we thought the commercialized trail would go on forever, we found the sign pointing at the beginning of the classic dirt road some of us were looking for. I couldn’t help but chuckle at the improvised road sign, a white board doodled with the mountain’s three peaks. It looked clear, wasn’t it?

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This sign is translated as, “The way going to the Pig’s Spine”

As we went up the trail, we could feel the heat of the sun trying to beat us down. But the refreshing winds came blowing at our tired muscles. Then, in just a few minutes, another drizzle comes again! Gladly, there were a lot of trees around us that protected us from both sun and rain.

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One of the tiny communities in the mountain

Just as I thought we would be far from civilization, there was booming, party music coming from a few meters ahead of us. Another house! Within the mountain was a tiny community, and some of them had stores selling water, buko juice, and even walking sticks. People here sure knew how to have a good business on tourism.

We’d find houses after a few meters, perhaps about two more. Passing by the last house to the top was a sign that we were at the last leg of the hike. The sun was beating us even more by then. But upon coming to the three peaks, there was an outpour.

We stayed beneath the tree and decided to take lunch there. The clouds looked gloomy and

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Dark clouds hover over Peak 2 and 3

threatening enough to spoil the view. Yet, things suddenly changed in a while. The moment we came upon the second peak, the weather was sunny again.

The clouds suddenly gave a nice cleaning. At once, we were jumping and posing for pictures like never before. Then, we ran towards the third and highest peak. At that point, I was tempted to stay forever.

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The sea opens up behind me at Peak 2

But as I ran towards the last stop, I was surprised to hear a bell clanging on the top. Ice-cream! Wasn’t this mountain so commercialized? But I ignored it and looked at the view below. This was the reward I wanted all along: the sight of a beautiful world while standing on top of it.

I tried to sleep for a while and so did one of my friends. I couldn’t though and just mused at the scenic view before me. I felt the privilege of looking at a wonderful world made by a wonderful Creator. Sometimes, one has to struggle through heights to appreciate the beauty of things.

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Trying to jump high on Peak 3!

Another rain cloud was approaching us. Soon enough, it was drizzling again. I wished to

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Another scenic view on Peak 3

stay longer, but we had to leave immediately. Now, I have to face another waterloo…the art of descending.

I always had the trouble of descending mountains. Until now, I still couldn’t find my footing. I’m always careful to keep myself from rolling face down. But I also had the trouble of keeping myself from sliding backwards. To keep that from happening, I had to take a slow step-

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Looking down at Peak 1 and 2 from the highest peak

by-step descent. But this time, I had to be more careful, because the dirt road has the tendency to become more slippery due to the drizzle.

The weather really is a weird thing. Here comes the drizzle, and then here comes the sun. It’s like it has been on a ruckus on who’s to rule the sky today, the weather is just confused, or it would like to play a trick on me. Nevertheless,

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Halo-halo, anyone?

it’s surprising that we were faster at our descent. The nearly two-hour ascent was slashed into thirty minutes!

Upon the end of the dirt road, we arrived at one of the little stores by the cemented road. There, we rewarded ourselves. Who would resist a nice, cold sweet halo-halo after a strenuous hike?

We would have loved to go to the beach after the hike but time was too short to enjoy the quiet sea. Besides, the 100 peso entrance fee would not be worth the short time we would be spending. I guess we’ll go back there another time. I guess I have to take scuba diving lessons when I return, don’t you think so?

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